Embracing the HAC

Don’t ever give up hope, some injuries take longer to heal than others and Swimmer’s shoulder can take as long as a normal pregnancy to heal, around 9 months.

It is hard not to take part in competitions and watch others rake in the medals whilst yourself is just kicking around in the pool. Yet, after 8 years of intense swimming there is little point in giving up the sport for an injury that is healable.

This just shows we are human beings with bodies that can break and need time to heal.

Our club and coach is fantastic in allowing swimmers to overcome injuries. It would be quite terrible if swimmers were discarded on the basis of having an injury. The key point is to keep training with the remaining parts of the body that allow keeping the core fitness at the highest possible peek whilst looking for solutions.

Ashley Twichell, a swimmer for Duke University wanted to get a place on the 2016 Olympic Team and gotten a shoulder injury. Read the story here how she overcame the problems.

Petria Thomas, Australia had to have several shoulder surgeries to win three golds at the Athens Olympics. Read that story here.

British diver Dan Goodfellow overcame nerve damage in his shoulder to win Bronze for Britain. Read the story here.

It really is not worth throwing years of training into the bin over a condition that is treatable and just needs a little time to diagnose and treat.

Keep on training with a coach that is knowledgeable on the condition.

There are great articles about this on the internet. The causes can vary, e.g.

  • nerve damage
  • torn tendon
  • scar tissue

There can be various causes and it is always worth looking into it properly rather than ignoring the pain and making it worst without proper treatment. We don’t know yet and do not want to attempt any treatments without knowing the exact cause. We’ve even had a suggeston that her pain could be in the mind!

Madison is still waiting for an MRI scan now and an appointment with an orthopaedic doctor. But in the meantime its training with the legs.

The kick is now tremendous. In effect it all depends if a swimmer really loves the sport, if they do then an injury will not stop them from pursuing the dream.

 

Use your loaf

Just to mention that when Madison had the Better sponsorship, during her membership with LACPP, Madison hardly had any time to go to the gym to top up the water-based club training. Madison never needed to see the physio. One felt invincible.

better=copper
Better membership card for the GLL training support

Then, the following year, I did not apply for the Better GLL sponsorship, which brings with it, free physio treatment. I thought we do not need it, Madison was never injured to a significant degree. I thought better let other athletes have the sponsorship, those who do need to supplement their training with extra gym sessions.

Now the injury has finally arrived. No, I have not been waiting for it but it has happened.

My GP told me that coming to the NHS for advice is a waste of time because the NHS has no resources to treat sporting injuries quickly enough. Perhaps the NHS should reconsider their treatment options. NHS constantly peaches to us about healthy life-styles, yet that brings with it more sporting activities with sporting related injuries. If the NHS wants to specialise in deteriorating illnesses, which are not sport related only, they should re-name themselves.

Now I have been told that the physio in my own club charges at least £50 for a consultation. Obviously like most average people I am not made of money.

I have to find ways of solving problems without spending even more than I already do on the swimming.

We have enormous cost because we not only need to pay the club membership, we also constantly got extra costs like:

  • Travel costs – to and from training and going to competitions
  • Accommodation cost – most further away competitions require hotel stays
  • Performance costumes – can cost around £300,–
  • Training equipment – quite a lot of stuff
  • Competition entry – At the LAC can cost up to £12,– per event.

Now having even more cost, would just about break the camels back.

I do not understand, that Swim England, doesn’t make Physios available for free. Just perhaps a physio per region. Or perhaps advertise for physios who want to help the sport on a voluntary basis.

I need to turn to the Internet for advice. There is quite a lot about. There are some useful pages, which are seriously useful. Search the Internet for Swimmer’s shoulder and some good pages with advice come up for free. Obviously it only needs a terra bad and a wall to do a couple of exercised.

Our club coaches are also pretty good and allow the continuation of training, just not using the injured shoulder. Yet active Physio intervention is not available, especially in the holidays. I am hoping that the Mel Marshall camp, that also cost quite a lot of money has gotten some solutions available.