50 m free world record female

It has finally happened, after all this time, this is one of the most long-standing world records of modern times, when it was stood by Britta Steffen on 2/8/2009 with a time of 23:73; it has now progressed to 23:67 from Sarah Sjostrom at the 2017 World Championships in Budapest. Sarah Sjostrom also took a margin of 0.78 seconds off the 50m butterfly. This beats the 0.53 seconds gap Adam Peaty achieved in the 50 breast. 0.78scds is a huge margin for a 1 lap race.

Commentators remarked that Britain does not have a sufficient sprint training program. Well perhaps the LAC offers an ideal venue for that purpose. British sprint swimmers have to train in Turkey because Britain has no dedicated sprinter program.

Is tall really the best asset in swimmng

I am writing all those who are not the tallest to stick to swimming.

looking at boxing as a sport and we see different classes of boxers, according to their weight, they can fight an equal partner. But then in boxing, each fight accumulates significant revenues and it is therefore profitable.

Swimming is not such a money raker, though lately, the increasingly impressive bodies and nice personalities of top swimmers, especially Adam Peaty, attract more viewers, now that the healthy body image is on the top of the agenda for many

I think it is because of financial considerations that swimming is merely portioned into age-groups. A big breakthrough lately has been a further distinction into able and various ability groups. Though if swimming was further portioned into height, then the swimming competitors would take considerably longer to process and already there are shortages of officials as it is in the average level 3 age-group competitions.

Though, when looking at swimming results I now straightaway, go to the swimmer’s Wikipedia page and see how high they are. I am always very relieved when I see that the tallest didn’t win.

The latest victory of Pellegrini in the 200 free for example, see Swimmingworld article, shows her not to be the tallest out of Katie Ledecky and McKeon, she is however only very marginally shorter than both.

Interestingly the Wikipedia profile of Katie Ledecky makes her 180cm whilst the Google search brings her up to 183cm.

In the Google search Emma McKeon is also 180cm and also 180cm on Wikipedia.

Frederica Pellegrini is 177cm on Google search and on Wikipedia.

The most significant height difference could be seen in the German Frankziska Hentke who won the prelims heat and gotten the silver in the finals of the World Championships in Budapest 2017. See FINA review.

Franziska Hentke is 169cm according to Google and also 169cm on Wikipedia. Franziska won the prelims before Yilin Zhou (175cm) and Mireia Belmonte (168cm). All these ladies are very muscular.

I would say that it often depends on the kind of stroke, whether shorter physical height can achieve.

Katinka Hosszu who currently holds the most world records for women is a mere 175cm.

I’ve also come across Katie Matts who was considerably shorter than her fellow competitors but won the British Champs 2 times in a row. Picture here on a podium in a different race where she won bronze, just to show the relative height. I am unable to find an article with her body height in it.

Layla Black won an impressive victory in the 200 breast at the LEN in Netanya Israel. Pics from British Swimming.

Last year, using the typical height charts I calculated Madison’s ultimate body height to become 175-78 but now I am not so sure. I think that height might play a big factor in how much one invests into the sport because the more time you invest the less time you have to do anything else.

I feel that endurance and bodybuilding can out-swim height and sprint ability in especially the 200m races in Butterfly and Breaststroke.

There is no need to be obsessive about height because the ultimate power of decision-making is with the swimmer and if the swimmer thinks they can win, they will want to try their hardest. Especially if swimming as sport increases the happiness factor of a swimmer and aids with learning there is no question that every length spent in the pool is time well spent.

Especially when Madison was younger and she was put into a fast heat, despite being so young, she always complaint, that everybody else was much taller than her. I think a swimmer learns to overcome certain fears and deal with it in a positive way.

But Hannah Miley must be an inspiration to anybody who is not very tall, she is a very fierce swimmer and full of winning energy.

 

Nothing is easy

Nowadays I often define myself by well-known song-titles as they define emotional milestones in my life. Jethro Tull had been one of my all-time favourite bands.

This song has probably one of the cleanest lyrics of the time, so it’s save to show it here.

Things constantly change in the life of a young swimmer; with the publication of Madison’s latest end-of-year results I definitely want to concentrate more on school work next year, the year when pupils enter their GCSE paths.

But it is not just so easy as to say, well my swimmer is not too good in school so we concentrate on swimming. I think it’s best to try out a lot of different sports to find a ‘suits us best’ style. Swimming always assisted Madison’s learning rather than hindering it.

I am constantly pondering over how much time we spend travelling, how much time we have for homework and other hobbies. How happy my swimmer is in the club they are in and how much money it all costs me.

It is much harder than I thought it possible to come to conclusions because Madison is smart and good at a lot of things, it is really hard concentrate on one sport. Because even in swimming things never stay the same. Favourite strokes also change constantly.

If I look at those swimmers currently at the top, I always wonder how they made their decisions to concentrate on their swimming careers. Perhaps I start reading biographies of swimmers next.

I am going to want to watch some life streams of competitions online to get some inspiration.

British Summer champs start in 3 days.

FINA world championships in Budapest are in full swing.

Commonwealth Youth Games in the Bahamas, 1 more day to go.

Expect a new FINA rule

To stop confusion on how long a swimmer has gotten to turn onto their front after using a flip-turn, FINA committee ponders over a rule-change that may be in place prior to the world championships in Budapest. This is about the so-called Lochte rule.

The suggested new ruling sounds like this: ”

“For freestyle in the medley, the swimmer must be on the breast except when executing a turn. The swimmer must return to the breast before any kick or stroke.”

Of course, in the Medley, freestyle can be any style except Breast, back or fly. So after a turn, the swimmer must return to swim on the breast because otherwise it would be a backstroke and no swimmer is allowed more backstroke than the distance allows. In a 400 IM, the backstroke can only be 100 meters.

Meaning after a turn a swimmer cannot, after kicking off the wall, do any movement unless they are in the correct position towards the stroke they swim. That means in all strokes, except for the backstroke, the swimmer has to be on the breast prior to kicking or moving arms?

The FINA rules on

  • Backstroke turns are very strict, it says: “The swimmer must have returned to the position on the back upon leaving the wall. “
  • Breaststroke turns it says: “After the start and after each turn, the body shall be on the breast.”
  • Butterfly turns it says: “From the beginning of the first arm stroke and after the start and each turn, the body shall be kept on the breast. Under water kicking on the side is allowed. It is not permitted to roll onto the back at any time, except at the turn after the touch of the wall where it is permissible to turn in any manner as long as the body is on the breast when leaving the wall. “
  • Freestyle rules say: “Freestyle means that in an event so designated the swimmer may swim any style, except that in individual medley or medley relay events, freestyle means any style other than backstroke, breaststroke or butterfly.

 

Source: Swimming World.

The three B’s

I am very happy to have passed my final assessment and qualified as J1 judge. I joined as swimming club volunteer with Madison’s increased participation in swimming competitions and wanting to make myself useful and also wanting to pick up some good tips on how to swim better.

Like myself, many swimming parents are not from a competitive swimming background and as such getting through all the rules can take longer than if one has been into competitive swimming previously.

Competition promoters really do rely on volunteers to staff the officials required to run such competitions and the FINA rules are quite strict on the officials requirements needed. Keeping those rules means an event can be licensed and the times achieved by the swimmers are official and get listed in the Personal Best Times charts kept online for all to see.

Trying to memorize the swim order in Medley swimming for example, I noticed there are three B’s and one F.

The B’s are in a different order depending whether it’s Individual Medley

  • Butterfly
  • Backstroke
  • Breaststroke
  • Freestyle

but in the Medley relay events, which allows groups of swimmers to race the order is

  • Backstroke
  • Breaststroke
  • Butterfly
  • Freestyle

The easy way to remember this is that IM starts with Butterfly and Medley relay starts with Backstroke. I know the Breaststroke always follows the Backstroke and the Freestyle is always last.

Personally I do not like to interfere too much into the training that Madison gets, it is up to her coach to teach her the important tactics and stroke techniques. I just like to understand the racing events and so can assist the swimmers and ensure, as far as I can that the best swimmer always wins. All swimmers need to get the same chances.

It is a lenghty process to become a swimming official and lots of practise is best.

 

Thurrock golds

Thurrock yesterday saw Madison smash her 100 freestyle PB by ~ 4 seconds to win gold and her 100 fly PB to win gold too.

In total Madison had 6 races and won 6 medals, 2 gold, 2 bronze, 2 place.

It was a 12-13 age group and Madison beat a strong field of older competitors to get

  • 50 free – 5th out of 26 competitors with 31:07
  • 100 fly – 1st out of 5 comp with 1:19:21
  • 100 back – 4th out of 18 comp with 1:17:37
  • 50 fly – 3rd out of 15 comp with 35:57
  • 50 back – 3rd out of 19 comp with 36:07
  • 100 free – 1st out of 18 comp with 1:07:57

The 100 freestyle win gives Madison 514 GB points, breaching the 500 mark for the first time. Madison improved her PB by ~ 4 secs. Full results

This was an aged 12-13 age-group and Madison was still 12 yesterday and won against older competitors, edging more closely to the regions top swimmers.

Qualify for London region?

We are getting ready for this year’s level 1, Basildon Spring long-course meet, this weekend. Dates coincide with London region age group champs.

Madison favourite stroke is the 50 back at the moment.

The official consideration time London Age Group champs for boys is 36:7 and for girls 36, both aged 13.

A male friend of Madison got accepted for regionals with an entry time of 36:20 that equals 241 Fina points. (Converted short-course time).

Madison’s time is 36:34 (long-course). That’s 412 Fina points.

I just don’t know why London region accepts 241 Fina points but doesn’t allow 412 Fina points to apply.

We are very glad to get the opportunity of participating on the level 1 Basildon and Phoenix meet that runs concurrently on the same dates as London Region Age Group champs and all the hard work at least led to 8 qualifying times for the Basildon meet.

FINA points

Just trying to find the best way to appreciate the placings Madison has gotten in the latest County championships, where Madison did not get a podium finish but had some very good Personal Best Times.

In mixed ability races winner always gets determined by the amount of FINA points a swimmer achieves. The highest number of points is 1000 and that is the points awarded to the world record holder; all slower swimmers get awarded FINA points in proximity of that world record.

Clubs always tend to praise the podium winners the most because that is the highest award a race winner gets in any particular meet. Yet the fastest swimmer in total is the person that is closest to the world record in their particular category.

Name      year of birth      stroke      time              FINA points   place
Madison 2004                   fly             36:65            320                  28.
The current world record for

  • male 50 meter fly is 22:43  = 1000 FINA points
  • female 50 met  fly is 24:43 = 1000 FINA points
  • So all a podium finish in any race, other than a race that sets a new world record says, is that the person who won the medal was the fastest at that meet.

For the first time in her young swimming career, Madison has breached the 400 points barrier, achieving 412 points for 50 backstroke and 403 points for 50 freestyle.

All swims were of course brilliant swims and I am looking forward to the last leg of the Essex Championships on the weekend 18/19 February at the Basildon Sporting Village.

It is getting very exciting now, and the desire to swim even better at the next meets has grown immensely. All points achieved, help the club in the overall rankings within the Essex county. I think it is brilliant that a small club like LACPP managed to get to 16. so far, Madison will try the hardest in the Block C swimming competitions.

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